Brain Mapping


Brain Mapping

An electroencephalogram (qEEG) is a common diagnostic tool used in neurology to map the electrical activity of the brain. It allows doctors or clinicians to identify patterns that correlate with symptoms and dysfunctional activities of the brain.

A brain map reads the electrical activity of hundreds of thousands of neurons firing off on specific locations of the brain. The electricity produced by the brain is the result of a chemical exchange – an exchange of neurotransmitters between cells. Neurotransmitters jump across cells, creating synaptic connections. Like signals, they travel along biological wires, activating other neurons and creating brain waves. The brain produces different types of waves all the time, which can be recorded with precision through a qEEG.


Delta, Theta, Alpha, and Beta Waves

When looking at the results of a Brain Map, we use statistical analysis of all frequency bands (Delta, Theta, Alpha, and Beta) to see how fast they cycle and to measure their amplitudes, their asymmetries, and coherence (how much electrical activity is shared between the two hemispheres of the brain). We then compare them with a normative reference range. We pay special attention to gross abnormalities that reflect structural problems.

If frequencies (measured in Hz) and amplitudes (measured up to approximately 30 micro-volts – μV) do not fall within an ideal range for the age of the patient, we then use the protocols created by the computer, place the electrodes where they will have the most impact on the brain, and exercise those locations with neurofeedback.

You can have a Brain Map generated within a 30 to 35-minute timeframe for a very reasonable price. After the scan, we sit with you for an extensive follow-up to review the results and answer all your questions. The mapping system stands alone. It’s not a component of neurofeedback, but neurofeedback doctors and clinicians consider electroencephalograms a key tool in identifying patterns that correlate to certain conditions and in formulating their therapy plans accordingly.

Schedule an appointment for a Brain Map to see if your brain is working at peak potential.


Brain Mapping

An electroencephalogram (qEEG) is a common diagnostic tool used in neurology to map the electrical activity of the brain. It allows doctors or clinicians to identify patterns that correlate with symptoms and dysfunctional activities of the brain.

A brain map reads the electrical activity of hundreds of thousands of neurons firing off on specific locations of the brain. The electricity produced by the brain is the result of a chemical exchange – an exchange of neurotransmitters between cells. Neurotransmitters jump across cells, creating synaptic connections. Like signals, they travel along biological wires, activating other neurons and creating brain waves. The brain produces different types of waves all the time, which can be recorded with precision through a qEEG.


Delta, Theta, Alpha, and Beta Waves

When looking at the results of a Brain Map, we use statistical analysis of all frequency bands (Delta, Theta, Alpha, and Beta) to see how fast they cycle and to measure their amplitudes, their asymmetries, and coherence (how much electrical activity is shared between the two hemispheres of the brain). We then compare them with a normative reference range. We pay special attention to gross abnormalities that reflect structural problems.

If frequencies (measured in Hz) and amplitudes (measured up to approximately 30 micro-volts – μV) do not fall within an ideal range for the age of the patient, we then use the protocols created by the computer, place the electrodes where they will have the most impact on the brain, and exercise those locations with neurofeedback.

You can have a Brain Map generated within a 30 to 35-minute timeframe for a very reasonable price. After the scan, we sit with you for an extensive follow-up to review the results and answer all your questions. The mapping system stands alone. It’s not a component of neurofeedback, but neurofeedback doctors and clinicians consider electroencephalograms a key tool in identifying patterns that correlate to certain conditions and in formulating their therapy plans accordingly.